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Has the Internet killed global TV news?

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Has the Internet killed global TV news?

We're working with the Rockefeller Foundation to run 10 short films across a variety of social media platforms in the build-up to the UN Climate Conference in New York on Sept 23.

Some of the numbers we're getting are very revealing. Last Thursday we posted a film about adaptation to food shortages and drought on Vimeo, Facebook, Twitter and others. Within 3 days it reached 626,500 people on Facebook, 57,500 of whom watched the video while a further 47,000  liked, shared, commented or clicked on the post. This is the best performer in the series so far, but the others tell a similar story (Better numbers were to follow, RW). 

Pre-2010 our films on global news channels would draw 10s thousands of online views in the week of transmission. Recently, 78 of our short films about health tx'd on BBCWN as part of our series The Health Show. All the films also ran on the BBCWN web site where the BBC's own metrics revealed that they each had an average of about 1,000 viewers over a whole year.  An Ipsos Mori survey* into the series, commissioned by The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, revealed that nearly 80% of opinion formers, the channel's key audience, watched on line.  Which sounds great, until you consider that 80% is less than 800 views (because not all the 1,000 on-line viewers were opinion formers).  These same films posted by us on Social Media have achieved, as expected, 10s of thousands of targeted plays**.

It seems we rely on our laptops and tablets for breaking news stories and informed op-ed opinon.  Do we only watch TV news channels when out of range of wifi? The world is changing.

* The survey was accurate to +/-20%.
** Typically between 15,000 and 50,000 with plenty of traffic coming through embeds in 3rd party web sites.